Slow Pizza – NYT

One part mother starter, one part 00 flour, five parts resting time… writer Oliver Strand cooked 200 pizzas and rediscovered the beauty of long-rise pizza dough for an article in the New York Times. I photographed the comparison. Here is the full article, and here is a recipe for Radicchio Pizza with Gremolata… so good.

On the left, the crust of a dough that rose for 3 hours, on the right the crust of a dough that aged a day
Radicchio Pizza with Gremolata

Oyster Farmer, PEI (Audio Slide Show)

On Prince Edward Island, Canada, oysters are harvested today much as they were 100 years ago. Oyster farmers float above oyster beds in dories, and they use long forked tongs to collect the shellfish from the red sandy bottom below. On board, they sort the oysters by shape and size, and pack them into crates. Here is a glimpse into one oyster fisherman’s morning on the sea, when the spring season opened this May.

Audio Slide Show – Oyster Farmer (1 min)

Philip Buote, oyster fisherman

Ceviche

Kendra McKnight, of Magpie Kitchen, introduced me to mackerel ceviche. It was a refreshing homecoming after a week of butter-dipped lobsters and clams, cheese-baked oysters, and cream-based mussel chowder on Prince Edward Island. I borrowed her recipe and lime-cured a version.

Tuna ceviche

Rhubarb

After a week-long journey – by train – to Prince Edward Island, Canada, to photograph oyster, mussel, and lobster fishermen with the chefs and writer of the Joe Beef cookbook, I stayed with friends Kendra & Joost in Montreal.

Kendra just finished a two year stint at a culinary school and she has been cooking private parties around Montreal and styling food for magazines and newspapers. We photographed the food she cooked for us to eat. For this rhubarb tart recipe visit Magpie Kitchen

Rhubarb from the market
Rhubarb chunks and sugar for roasting
Rhubarb tart with a cream cheese & whipped cream filling
At Kendra’s house Rhubarb tart is the first course of three for breakfast

Instantly Indian

Maya Kaimal launched her eponymous Fine Indian Foods line after coworkers raved about the sumptuous feasts she cooked for them. You can find Maya Kaimal Fine Indian Foods products in over 1000 stores across the country: Whole Foods Market carries the sauces, as do gourmet and specialty shops. We photographed a selection of dishes the home-cook can easily prepare at home.

Recipes the home-cook can make using Maya Kaimal products: left: Madras Chicken Curry, and right: Tamarind Curry Shrimp Kebabs

All of Maya’s sauces are delicious combined with almost any combination of vegetable or protein. Here is one idea:

Maya Kaimal’s Tamarind Curry Grilled Shrimp Kebabs
Serves 4

1 ½  lb extra large shrimp, peeled and deveined
1 cup Maya Kaimal Tamarind Curry
2 tablespoons chopped cilantro (optional)
2 tablespoons sliced scallions (optional)
Indian Naan or other flatbread (optional)

1.  Pre-heat grill to medium.
2.  Toss shrimp with ½ cup of Tamarind Curry. Thread shrimp onto 8 skewers.
3. Place kebabs on grill and cook for 2 minutes on the first side. Turn the kebabs over and baste with some of the remaining Tamarind Curry.  Continue grilling and basting the kebabs until the shrimp are cooked through, a few minutes more.
4.  If you like, garnish kebabs with the cilantro and scallions and serve with grilled naan or other flatbread.

Find more recipes at www.mayakaimal.com

Mojito Time

While wandering around Rhinebeck, NY, shooting a story on the town, I visited the Blue Cashew Kitchen Pharmacy. The staff was squeezing limes for the mojitos they were preparing for the annual Taste of Rhinebeck event that night. This shot probably doesn’t sum up Rhinebeck enough to make it into the magazine, but it is a reminder that summer is on the way.

A fresh lime simple syrup

Pig to Pork

In April 2010 Fleisher’s Grass-fed & Organic Meats hosted a full-day class in butchery. Students observed master butcher Hans Sebold slaughter a locally-raised heritage pig at a family-owned farm in Stone Ridge, NY. Back at the shop, Joshua Applestone and Thomas Schneller, master butcher and CIA instructor, led demonstrations in pig butchery, sausage-making, and curing charcuterie.

I am not including the more graphic of my photos, but if you are sensitive you may want to skip this one.

Cupcakes in the theme of the day await the diners after the last butchery class

Mint

At Mint Premium Foods in Tarrytown, NY you may trip when reaching for an obscure food product on the haphazardly stacked shelves, but it might be worth the risk for all the fine cheese you will sample while tending your bruise. Shot for the Spring 2010 issue of Edible Hudson Valley.

Owner Hassan Jarane used to be a photographer in Manhattan, until he got tired of lugging gear around
Maria and the rotisserie filled with spiced chickens
Shelf stable

Butcher Blackout

In March, 2010, Joshua Applestone of Fleisher’s Grass-fed & Organic Meats in Kingston, NY and Tom Mylan of The Meat Hook in Brooklyn, took a group of butchers and friends-of-butchers on a late-night tour through Williamsburg. The annual event is known as the Butcher Blackout.

Butchers Joshua Applestone and Tom Mylan

Joe Beef Cookbook

On location in Montreal, Canada on a shoot for the Joe Beef Cookbook we are doing for Ten Speed Press.

Signage and shadows
Updating the menu board is a daily task
Food looks beautiful on these white dishes with scalloped edges

Rabbits for the NYT

I was asked to visit a rabbit farm to photograph a rabbit for the front page of the New York Times’s Dining section. Of course, I gave them a bunch of options. Here is the one that ran, and if you click through you will see more of the Dining editor’s favorites on the NYT Blog. You will also read a lot of irate comments from readers. People canceled subscriptions they were so angry about this story. To paraphrase a poster with a different attitude, ‘It seems it’s only edible if it’s not cute.’

Outtakes from the rabbit cover

A March 2010 Dining cover story in the New York Times

Julie Powell

The ultimate food blogger, Julie Powell, author of Julie & Julia, on location at Fleisher’s – the butcher shop where she interned for her new book Cleaving. This portrait of Julie did double duty for a profile about her in Chronogram magazine, and it will also be included in my upcoming book, River of Words: Portraits of Hudson Valley Writers (SUNY Press, August 2010).

Julie Powell, photographed at Fleisher's

Holiday Party with Chef Dave

I hosted a holiday dinner party for 12 friends who love food. One friend makes his own sausages and grills pizzas in the wood-fired oven he built in his backyard, other friends work at such publications as New York magazine, or write about food for the New York Times, or are the editor of the Hudson Valley’s Chronogram magazine, and one friend just likes to open restaurants. Of course, the thought of cooking for such a crowd made me shiver.

That’s where Chef David Matthew Lydick, executive chef of Revolution Cuisine stepped in. He and his sous chef shopped for and cooked a 12 course dinner for us, while the rest of us made our way through two cases of wines. It was an unforgettable evening of extravagance. Thank you, Chef Dave.

Shopping with the chef

The chef multi-tasks
The chef prepared his 12 course dinner from these scrawled notes
One of the many hors d'eourves was a coconut chicken satay on a tiny banana bread muffin
For the second course the chef made baby back riblets with a maple ginger bourbon sauce, and Asian cole slaw
Grilling apples in sub-zero weather
Preparing one of two salad courses: Swiss chard gratin with local baby arugula and walnut black olive pesto
The second salad course was an immense hit: pan seared cape diver scallop, with apple nut salad, and a peanut vinaigrette
The soup course was unforgettably delicious: smoked salmon chowder with smoked trout lox, and rainbow trout caviar
The chef went hunting and made Catskill venison carppacio with local baby arugula, roasted shallot and grape relish, on a garlic croustini
Guests
You've got to love a chef who leaves a kitchen cleaner than when he arrived

The full menu:

hors varies

coconut chicken satay on banana bread muffin

macaroni and kunik goat cheese bites

Catskill venison carppacio    local baby arugula  roasted shallot and  grape relish    garlic croustini

mezze’

carrot pea raisin cilantro lime    raw kale and lemon garlic    fresh grilled vegetable caponata

amuse’

pigs in a bacon blanket    inside out smore

salads

Swiss chard gratin  local baby arugula  walnut black olive pesto

pan seared cape diver scallop    apple nut salad   peanut vinaigrette

soup

smoked salmon chowder    smoked trout lox    rainbow trout caviar

first course

mixed game burger   applewood smoked bacon  Vermont cheddar  polenta cookie  Morroccan chutney

second course

baby back riblets    asian cole slaw    maple ginger bourbon sauce

third course

garlic studded leg of lamb    root vegetable latke    grilled apple sauce   cider reduction   herb crème’

dessert

brie and red grape rum pudding with saffron crème anglaise and rosemary

Prepared by Chef David Matthew Lydick, Executive Chef, Revolution Cuisine

chef@revolutioncuisine.com

845.853.3333

Core Vodka

Micro-distilled Core vodka is made exclusively from apples grown on Derek Grout’s family farm in Valatie, NY. The pear brandy is amazing, too.

Derek Grout of Harvest Spirits pours off a sample of vodka to check the flavor
Taste test
Core Vodka, at home

The Harvest Spirits website

Kitchen Tour of Mexico

Hopping around Puerto Vallarta, Mexico with my brother was a blast. He has been bicycling around the world for ten years (favorite stops: Argentina, Brazil, Mexico, Thailand, India, France, Ireland, and Greece) learning languages and planting trees. His olive skin has turned a darker shade from years of exposure to the sun and elements and he speaks Spanish with a Portuguese accent. Everywhere we ate in Mexico he asked the chefs if his sister could take pictures in the kitchen.

Preparing chili peppers
Way off the beaten path we ate spicy beans with eggs and fresh tortillas. Dipping into the salsa pots would have made Anthony Bourdain proud.
Cooking for an outdoor patio setting
The chefs behind my mother’s favorite restaurant
Not exactly the kitchen scene I’m used to seeing in NY, but tasty food none-the-less
This woman cooks out of her open-walled kitchen & living room. She told my brother she is not much of a cook, but for $1 it was pretty good.
A typical produce stand
Brother Ryan

Farm Stay – NYT

Stony Creek Farm in Walton, NY, offers tent style camping (complete with flushing toilets, indoor gas stove, a wood floor platform, and furniture) to people who want the farm and camping experience without all the roughing it. I shot a story about it for the New York Times.

Slide Show – Farm Stay

Stony Creek Farm in Walton, NY, shot for the New York Times

North Winds Farm

Obviously, I don’t shy away from meat. But like so many others, I was a strict vegetarian for almost a decade. Luckily, there are now sources to buy meat that comes from well cared for animals that lived decent lives. On a recent shoot with farmer Richard Biezynski at North Winds Farm near Tivoli, NY, he told me if he hadn’t become a farmer, he would have been a vet. On season, you will often find me visiting his booth at the Woodstock Farmers’ Market.

Farmer Richard Biezynski and his son, Russell, at Northwind Farms, where they raise pigs

Wild Boar Weekend (Audio Slide Show)

The folks at Brooklyn-based A Razor, A Shiny Knife (self-described as “an educational, social and theatrical culinary experience”) hosted a weekend event near Ithaca, NY in which guests witnessed a boar journey from farm to table. I photographed and captured sound from the all-day event for the New York Times. Follow through below for the audio-slide show.

Audio Slide Show on the New York Times’s site (2:14 min)

Shot for the New York Times’s Dining section
Food stories in New York's Hudson Valley and beyond from photographer Jennifer May